The City Built from Bur Oak

  There are few cities for which we can say exactly what trees built the city, but we can for the city where I live. Lexington, KY, was founded in 1775, but the first permanent structures were not built until 1779.  On April 17, 1779, Josiah Collins and others cut down a huge bur oak. […]

Mistletoe

It’s the season not only to bring trees and other greens indoors, but also to kiss under the mistletoe.  The origins of this tradition are ancient,  rooted in Celtic and Old Germanic traditions.  In Europe, mistletoe is mostly found in oaks, and was thought to be found only in lightning-struck oaks.  So mistletoe was imbued […]

Picture of American basswood, Tilia americana

Field Course: Venerable Trees of the Lexington Cemetery, November 23, 2013

What:  A tour of Lexington Cemetery to look at Venerable Trees. Instructors:  Tom Kimmerer, PhD, Chief Scientist at Venerable Trees Inc. Special Guest:  Miles Penn, Horticulturist of Lexington Cemetery When:  Saturday, November 23, 10 am to noon, Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, KY  (map). We will meet just inside the cemetery entrance and will walk the grounds […]

Picture of sugar maple leaves in fall colors

Don’t make candy trees

Autumn provides a huge opportunity for the photographer, whether amateur or professional.  The skies vary from shades of grey to brilliant blue, damp weather often makes color more vivid, and the incredible colors of autumn leaves are irresistible.  I will discuss fall colors from a tree’s point of view in a later post.  First I […]

kingnut, Carya laciniosa

Herald-Leader Article

Tom Eblen, a fine reporter for the Lexington Herald-Leader, has written a really good article about our work at Venerable Trees. Tom Eblen: Effort takes root to protect Central Kentucky’s most majestic old trees

Blue ash, Fraxinus quadrangulata

Equine Photographer – Just for fun

This is just for fun.  While out photographing trees, my equipment was taken over by some beautiful mares and one of them, Violet Lady, figured out how to work the shutter.

The best year to be a tree, Part 2

Part 1 described the unusual shoot growth pattern of trees this year.  Here we discuss why this happened. Everyone realizes that this was an usual summer in eastern North America.  We had a mild summer and a remarkable amount of precipitation.  This graph (click for full size) is from the NOAA Climate At A Glance […]

The best year to be a tree, Part 1

Now that the Autumnal Equinox has arrived, it is a good time to look back on this year in the Lives of Trees.   For Eastern North America, this has been a great year to be a tree.  Temperatures were mild to moderate for most of the growing season, soil moisture was adequate to above […]

The Barrel

Since The Bourbon Review is our launch sponsor (Thanks!), here is a short piece about the bourbon barrel. By law, Bourbon has to be aged in new oak barrels.  What kind of wood is used?  Any white oak wood will work, but red oak will not. In Kentucky, white oak, Quercus alba,  is used almost […]

Picture of blue ash tree

Don’t Miss the Workshop!

  When:  Saturday, October 12, 2013 Where: Floracliff State Nature Preserve and locations in Fayette and Scott Counties The workshop is filling up and can only accommodate 20 people.  Read more about the Workshop, and call Floracliff to register.   Please note that clicking Going on our Facebook page does not register you for the […]

Remembering Moosewood Bill Harlow

Cross-posted at Native Tree Society. Many of us are familiar with the books by William Harlow, including the classic Textbook of Dendrology (Harlow and Harrar), Fruit Key and Twig Key and other forestry books. This reminiscence is sparked by several pictures from one of Harlow’s books posted on Facebook by Chris Budesa. When I was […]